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Italy's Best Foodie Vacation: Here's How To Eat Your Way Through Sicily

Aggiornato il: 2 nov 2019

First inhabited some 10,000 years ago, Sicily is a dazzling destination with a fascinating and arguably incomparable past, thanks to its centuries-long perch at the crossroads of history before becoming part of Italy in 1860. The island’s strategic location in the Mediterranean—100 miles northeast of Tunisia and separated from the Italian mainland by the Strait of Messina—landed it squarely in the sights of the Phoenicians, Arabs, Greeks, Romans and Bourbons (to name just a handful), who stormed its shores and conquered various parts over the ages, each adding a unique cultural layer to this former front line of some of the world’s greatest empires.


Sicily's incomparable history owes much to its strategic position in the Mediterranean, and informs its unique cuisine. ITALIAN NATIONAL TOURIST BOARD
Sicily's incomparable history owes much to its strategic position in the Mediterranean, and informs its unique cuisine. ITALIAN NATIONAL TOURIST BOARD

Not surprisingly, such an amalgamated antiquity also gave rise to one of the most richly textured culinary heritages anywhere on earth. In the west, couscous is an enduring mainstay thanks to the Arabs, who named the ancient city of Palermo as the island’s capital in the 9th century. (The Cous Cous Fest in the northwestern beach town of San Vito Lo Capo, an international competition that draws chefs from around the world, celebrated its 20th anniversary last year.) They also instilled a penchant for spices like cinnamon and saffron, and a passion for sweets like cassata, a sponge cake layered with ricotta and candied fruit.  Meanwhile, the Greeks, who left an indelible mark on the island between the 8th and 4th centuries B.C., introduced olives, grapes and wine-making, which remain major industries. Today, Sicilian cuisine is a singular combination of Arab, Greek, French, Spanish and North African influences, with myriad Italian flavors thrown in for good measure.


Sicilian cannoli, one of the specialties that has made the Italian island a sought-after destination for serious foodies. DISCOVER YOUR ITALY
Sicilian cannoli, one of the specialties that has made the Italian island a sought-after destination for serious foodies. DISCOVER YOUR ITALY

Should you want to sample Sicily’s extraordinary gastronomic smorgasbord, Matteo Della Grazia, cofounder of Discover Your Italy, an award-winning travel agency based in Perugia, offers just the itinerary for intrepid gourmets. Painstakingly curated all the way from Palermo to Catania, with plenty of mouthwatering stops in between, Della Grazia has created a tantalizing tasting menu of a trip that showcases many of the delicacies—and the locales they hail from—for which Sicily is celebrated. (And he might even pick you up at the airport with some of Palermo’s best cannoli in hand to rejuvenate you after a long flight.) Following is an overview of what this top-notch tour holds in store.


Palermo's famous cathedral is a stunning pit stop during a day of touring the city's renowned open-air markets. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN
Palermo's famous cathedral is a stunning pit stop during a day of touring the city's renowned open-air markets. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN

Founded in 734 B.C. and once part of the Roman Empire, the island’s bustling capital is as renowned for its scrumptious street food and sprawling outdoor markets as it is for its stunning Baroque architecture and Mafia lore. A visit to Focacceria del Massimo, where four generations of one family have been serving up Palermo’s street-snack standouts for over 90 years, is a fitting (and filling) way to kick off a day of exploring this exotic, gritty city. For starters, try the panelle—crispy flat fritters made from chickpea flour, another legacy of the region’s Middle Eastern influence—then dive into the arancine, beloved far and wide and filled here with ham and cheese or a traditional ragù with beef, peas, and carrots. (In keeping with Sicily’s fiercely independent spirit, the word for these tasty treats in its west—arancina—is feminine, in homage to local oranges, unlike in the east and the rest of Italy, where an arancino is masculine. The Accademia della Crusca, Italy's preeminent authority on the Italian language and the world's oldest linguistic academy, even weighed in on the debate following petitions from western Sicilians, deeming both terms acceptable.) Potato crocché, or croquettes, made with cheese—and, uniquely, mint—are akin to the Sicilian version of French fries, but better: it’s hard to stop at just one...or three, or five.


Palermo's street food, including panelle, arancine, and crocché, is some of the best in the world. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN
Palermo's street food, including panelle, arancine, and crocché, is some of the best in the world. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN

Sated by these savory specialties, you’ll be ready to stroll off the carbs exploring Palermo’s storied open-air markets, which have been central to daily life in this rough-edged metropolis since the Arabic period—and appropriately, have a labyrinthine, souk-like feel, weaving through narrow lanes and alleyways, with the cacophony of vendors hawking their wares and locals exchanging garrulous greetings serving as a soundtrack. Impossibly fresh seafood takes center stage at the Capo market, a hangout for pirates, slave merchants and other pillars of the community during ancient times. If you're lucky enough to visit in May or June, you’ll find stall after stall laden with giant bluefin tuna, which first swam straight into Sicilian legend many centuries ago. Every year, schools of the fish (some of which reach up to nearly 1,800 pounds) migrate through the Mediterranean en route to the Atlantic; as they passed the Egadi Islands to Sicily’s west, resident fishermen would lie in wait, steering them through an ever-smaller series of nets into the final trap—a square pen called the camera della morte, or "chamber of death"—where they were savagely speared by their captors (many singing old Arabic fishing songs all the while) and hauled onto boats to be taken to market.


While La Mattanza, the traditional Sicilian ritual of fishing for giant bluefin tuna, was outlawed years ago, Sicilians' appetite for the fish endures. DISCOVER YOUR ITALY
While La Mattanza, the traditional Sicilian ritual of fishing for giant bluefin tuna, was outlawed years ago, Sicilians' appetite for the fish endures. DISCOVER YOUR ITALY

While this gory ritual, called La Mattanza (the massacre), was outlawed more than a decade ago and the tuna are now captured through more conventional (and less bloody) means, the Sicilian appetite for this prize catch endures: Glistening crimson hunks of tonno, some the size of ham hocks, are showcased next to the belly and often the head, a striking tableau. In between filleting and selling his seafood, a fishmonger will occasionally ring his stall’s bell with the zeal of a general alerting his troops of an unforeseen enemy invasion, frantically signaling neighboring merchants when a leggy bella donna is headed their way.


To get from Capo to Ballarò—the city’s oldest and largest market—you cross the ancient Cassaro,  Palermo’s oldest thoroughfare. A study in ordered chaos and ripe with a panoply of aromas (many better than others), it’s akin to a boisterous medieval marketplace where anything and everything is for sale: velvety peaches, glossy eggplants, and pyramids of crimson tomatoes share real estate with socks, cellphone covers, T-shirts, and myriad other odds and ends. Turn down an alley to find waxy pink pigs’ heads hung high from huge hooks, seemingly surveying a scene filled with tables groaning under piles of cheeses—fat wheels of Parmigiano-Reggiano, warm ricotta fresca al forno with honey and pistachio, chunks of Sicilian caciocavallo (a sharp variation of provolone)—and baskets brimming with babbaluci ("snails" in Sicilian), many of which cling to the woven handles, possibly in an effort to escape their inevitable fate. And don’t forget the small mountains of briny olives, toasted nuts, fragrant spices, dried fruits, and succulent capers for which Sicily and especially its neighboring island, Pantelleria, are famous. To say you could spend hours shopping and eating your way through the mayhem is an understatement; fervent foodies will want to set up camp and stay for days.


A small sampling of the countless delicacies for sale at Palermo's Ballarò market, the city's oldest and largest. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN
A small sampling of the countless delicacies for sale at Palermo's Ballarò market, the city's oldest and largest. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN

Rounding out an action-packed day in Palermo is a spin through the Vucciria market, near Piazza San Domenico (home to the city’s second most famous church behind the jaw-dropping city cathedral, also on the itinerary). While the market has shrunk considerably in its impressive 700-year run, it’s still worth a visit, even just for a pani ca meusa prepared by resident celebrity Rocky Basile, sometimes called the “King of the Vucciria.” Literally “bread with spleen,” the storied sandwich is filled with veal spleen (which has a surprisingly calamari-like texture) expertly fried in lard at his trusty cart by the master, who serves it with a spritz of lemon on a deliciously soft sesame roll. To reward yourself for polishing off this separates-the-men-from-the-boys Palermitan specialty (word of advice: don’t think about it, just eat it), make your way to the nearby Gelateria Lucchese for creamy gelato served on a golden brioche bun, another five-star Sicilian indulgence. It’s twice as decadent as it sounds and worth every calorie.


The landscape at Saline della Laguna, on Sicily's Salt Road between Trapani and Marsala, is almost otherworldly. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN
The landscape at Saline della Laguna, on Sicily's Salt Road between Trapani and Marsala, is almost otherworldly. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN

The landscape along the “Via del Sale,” or Salt Road—the moniker given to the coastline between Trapani and Marsala in Sicily’s west—likely looks much like it did when the Phoenicians began producing the crucial commodity here after their arrival around 800 B.C.: shallow saline pools, divided by narrow strips of land and buffered by hot African winds under a relentlessly sunny sky, studded with gleaming mountains of salt and Dutch-style windmills (the latter having arrived long after these early settlers). Production reached its zenith in this region, around 100,000 tons, after Italy's unification in 1860, when salt was exported throughout Europe and beyond; today, it enjoys a niche market primarily with gourmets who swear by its delicate flavor, purity (100% natural), and attributes (more potassium and magnesium than the common variety).


Workers harvest salt by hand at Saline della Laguna four times per year, in summer through fall. SALINE DELLA LAGUNA
Workers harvest salt by hand at Saline della Laguna four times per year, in summer through fall. SALINE DELLA LAGUNA

The intriguing Saline della Laguna in Mozia, a cultural center dedicated to this ancient tradition, was our next stop after Palermo. The area’s flat, expansive topography is almost otherworldly: A stroll along the rocky paths that divide the silty salt pans, the sun dappling the water under an azure sky, brings to mind what a visit to Mars might resemble. (The entire area was designated a nature reserve in 1991; at certain times of year, flamingos snack on the tiny shrimp that live in the surrounding lagoons.) The centerpiece is the Mill of Infersa, a functioning windmill that dates back to 1500 and houses a museum and tasting rooms, where you can sample the unique salts produced here (flavors include juniper, coriander, and sage) with accompaniments including bread, olive oil, and fresh fruit. If you visit in summer through fall, you might witness the manual harvest that takes place four times annually; bronze-skinned workers in broad-brimmed hats use shovels to break the salt crust in the crystallization tanks, collecting and raking the bounty into rows of snow-white heaps.


The view from La Foresteria, the luxury resort of the Planeta wine estate, in Menfi. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN
The view from La Foresteria, the luxury resort of the Planeta wine estate, in Menfi. ALEXANDRA KIRKMAN

Located just over 50 miles from Palermo, the agricultural center of Menfi, carpeted with rolling, vineyard-studded hills overlooking the white-sand beaches of the nearby coast, is an oenophile’s paradise. It’s also home to the lovely La Foresteria, the boutique wine resort of the prestigious Planeta Estate, a family of winemakers that’s been honing its craft for over five centuries, with a viticultural footprint that today extends across Sicily. Our next port of call after Mozia and Marsala, the property, whose 14 rooms (named after herbs grown in its garden) all boast ocean views, exudes casual elegance and an almost palpable stillness; it’s difficult not to feel totally Zen while gazing seaward across the verdant hills from your private terrace at sundown, when strokes of hazy lavender and rose-gold paint the sky.